Tuesday, 3 April 2012

skipping rhymes and games

Can anyone help?

Can you remember any of the skipping rhymes that you used when you were young? 

Our girls have (finally) started to enjoy skipping with their friends (with a long rope).  Skipping isn't a tradition here so no-one knows any rhymes.

 I can remember:

Blue Bells
Cockle Shells
Iv-y I-vy Over

Little Red Racing Car
Number 99.
Racing round the cor-------ner

Teddy Bear Teddy Bear
turn around.
Teddy bear, teddy bear
touch the ground.
Teddy bear, teddy bear
go up the stairs
Teddy bear, teddy bear
say your prayers.
Teddy bear, teddy bear
turn out the light
Teddy bear, teddy bear
say good night.

8 comments:

Meredith said...

Two little blue birds
sitting on a wall,
one named Peter,
one named Paul.
Fly away Peter,
fly away Paul.
Come back Peter,
Come back Paul.

(Leave the rope on the fly away and run around the outside and return to the middle to keep jumping on the come back part. But if you cause the rope to tangle or stop then you have to hold the rope for the next turn.)

Alison Blake said...

Spelling Hipp-o-pot-a-mus
You've got the hip (put hand on hip)
The "O" (put arms up in the air in the shape of an O)
The "Pot" (put arms in front of you -- still in the O shape -- imagine you're hugging a big pot in front of you)
The "Toe" (lift one of your legs up and touch your toe with your hand)
And the "Miss"! (stop the skipping rope by jumping over it, one leg on each side, when it's on the ground)
(the child should do each of the commands while skipping (er, the "splits" is more like making a V with your legs unless you're really talented)

I went upstairs to make my bed
I made a mistake and bumped my head
I went downstairs to milk my cow
I made a mistake and milked the sow
I went into the kitchen to bake a pie
I mad a mistake and baked a fly
How many flies does it take to make a pie
{count until someone misses}

Rachael said...

Thanks Meredith!

There's something similar for "The little red racing car". Leave the rope where it says "racing round the cor----" and run around one of the turners and then return to the rope and on the first jump inside again, say "ner".
.
.
.

Rachael said...

Thanks Alison.

There was one that had the line "tell me the name of your sweetheart". But I can't remember the rest. Does anyone know it? Maybe it's better unremembered.

Anonymous said...

I don't know rhymes but i saw an interesting documentary about an English family where the parents decided their children need to experience simpler life styles so they spent some weeks with an Amazonian Indian tribe, which still hunted and lived their primitive life style.

Overcoming the language barrier, the children learnt a lot; even the eldest a boy got over his self consciousness and stripped off. But the one tradition the English daughters could teach the tribal children was skipping, and they did; and it caught on.

Anonymous said...

Sue said:

After your first one, it goes on to
Old Mother Moore,
She lived by the shore.
She had children, 3 and 4.
The oldest one was 24, and she got married to a [change to peppers]:
tinker, tailor, soldier, sailor,
rich man, poor man, beggarman, thief

but we said, "sea shells" not "bluebells"

Cath said...

This brings me back to Brookvale Public School in the 1970s. With Little Red Racing Car, when we returned from "coooooorner", we would continue skipping to "Switch off the engine and slam on the brakes" (where we would land with the rope between our feet, so it would stop).
Another popular skipping rhyme at our school was Up the Mississippi. There would be two people turning the ropes, and a line of people ready for a turn. Each person would get four jumps to the rhyme: "Up the Mississippi if you miss a loop you're out." You would enter from one side, and exit from the other. If you missed a loop entering or exiting, you would be eliminated.

Anonymous said...

"Rasberry, strawberry, apple-jam-tart! Tell me the name of your sweetheart" then the ropeturners go through the alphabet and the person skipping stops the rope on their sweetheart's initial OR ther rope turners try to get them out on the initial of someone they would definitely not want as a sweetheart...!